Planes, trains, automobiles, and a voyage on the high seas

Being car-less for the past 8 months has forced us to be creative in selecting our modes of transportation to get around Japan. While trains and bikes are the go-to options for daily life, neither was very practical for a week in Hokkaido. The train system on the north island – particularly the east side – is relatively sparse and infrequent (though I feel silly for writing that, because Japan’s lousiest train system still puts Amtrak to shame). It worked out to be much more efficient to rent a car and to take advantage of frequent regional flights that operate between the handful of airports.
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The fish market

Not long after moving here, I stumbled upon a gem tucked in some back alleys and warehouses near Nagoya Station. I’ve been around Seattle long enough to know what it means when you see men running around in rubber boots and carrying Styrofoam boxes full of ice: it must be a fish market. After a few days of walking past and trying to catch a glimpse inside, I finally worked up the courage to venture into the fray. Hanging around Pike Place Market in Seattle doesn’t prepare you for the utter chaos that is a high-volume wholesale fish market in Japan. Restaurant buyers are placing huge orders, men are carving tuna with 3-foot-long “knives”, and orders are being rushed to and from trucks on speeding carts.

Visits to this morning market have become a real treat for me over the past six months. I always make a point of taking visitors there, since it is such an “authentic” experience. I’ve grown from being too nervous to check it out to becoming a regular customer… I even have “my guy” that always gives me a discount on a small package of tuna from that day’s fish. I love it.

Today I visited the market with my camera in hand, hoping to capture some of the experience in order to share it with you. Warning: there are a lot of dead animals in the following blog post. Sorry, that’s just the way it is.
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Fast food and guilty pleasures

The food in Japan is very, very good. No two ways about it. When you have a culture that prides itself on attention to detail and has an appreciation for only the freshest ingredients, the only possible result is delicious food. On the other hand, the food in Japan can be very, very expensive. There are times when I don’t feel like cooking but also don’t feel like breaking the bank at a restaurant… so we take those opportunities to hit the local fast food joints. I’m only a little ashamed to admit that I’ve become somewhat of a connoisseur of Japanese fast food. Continue reading